About lowRISC

lowRISC is creating a fully open-sourced, Linux-capable, RISC-V-based SoC, that can be used either directly or as the basis for a custom design. We aim to complete our SoC design this year.

Our open-source SoC (System-on-a-Chip) designs will be based on the 64-bit RISC-V instruction set architecture. Volume silicon manufacture is planned as is a low-cost development board.

lowRISC is a not-for-profit organisation working closely with the University of Cambridge and the open-source community.

To keep track of the project, follow @lowRISC or join our announcements list by entering your email below:

You may also want to browse our code on GitHub.

If you want to get in touch, please email info@lowrisc.org

Recent milestones

May 2017: New lowRISC code release brings back tagged memory with builtin support in Rocket core and has a minion driven SD.

July 2016: New lowRISC code release including support for trace debug.

June 2016: Presented a brief tutorial at DAC on prototyping RISC-V SoCs using lowRISC and Xilinx FPGAs.

June 2016: We were thrilled to be given five student slots in the 2016 Google Summer of code. See here for more information about their projects.

Dec 2015: We have untethered the Rocket SoC, which now runs standalone on the KC705 and Nexys4DDR FPGAs. This release also includes support for simulation using Verilator and is accompanied by extensive documentation.

The Team

lowRISC was founded by:

  • Robert Mullins - Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, co-founder of Raspberry Pi
  • Gavin Ferris - Dreamworks, Radioscape (co-founder), Aspect Capital (former CIO)
  • Alex Bradbury - Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge and Raspberry Pi

In addition to the above, the core development team at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory is comprised of:

  • Wei Song
  • Jonathan Kimmitt

We are also grateful to our collaborators elsewhere in the community, as well as the undergraduates, graduate students, and interns who have contributed.

Technical Advisory Board